,

Darren votes on EU withdrawal bill amendments

This week, the EU (Withdrawal) Bill, which decides how we will leave the EU – if we do – came back to the House of Commons. The House of Lords had added amendments including for EEA membership and a meaningful vote in Parliament on the final deal. The Commons was asked to vote on these. Darren wrote a letter to constituents, published on Facebook, explaining how he would vote. You can read the letter here.

 

, ,

Darren asks experts about social media and violence

 

The Science and Technology Committee, which Darren is a member of, held public evidence session on social media and its links to violence. This was part of its inquiry on Social Media and screens-use.

The witnesses present were Martin Hewitt, Assistant Commissioner, Metropolitan Police Service, Dr Netta Weinstein, Senior Lecturer, Cardiff University, Beth Murray, Director of Communications and Engagement, Catch 22, Dr Keir Irwin-Rogers, Lecturer, The Open University, and Sheldon Thomas, Consultant on gang and youth violence, Gangsline.

Darren asked the witnesses about the funding for online policing, and who should be responsible for enforcing regulation on the internet.

,

Darren asks scientific experts about social media and the harm it could cause

Darren was present at the Science and Technology committee’s first evidence session for its Social media and screens-use inquiry. Here, charities, learned societies and academics were asked about cyber-bullying, addiction and body image.

The witnesses shown here were Matt Blow, Policy and Government Affairs Manager, YoungMinds, Dr Liam Hackett, CEO, Ditch the Label, Dustin Hutchinson, Research and Policy Analyst, National Children’s Bureau, and Carolyn Bunting, CEO, Internet Matters.

Darren asked the witnesses about the age of consent for social media, and about evidence linking social media to health related harms.

, ,

Darren speaks to TalkRadio about tipping scandals

Darren spoke to TalkRadio about scandals around waiting staff tips. Some restaurants are taking staff tips, and some are even charging waiting staff money in case they get any tips. Darren then talked about what he was going to do about this.

You can listen to the full interview here:

, ,

Darren asks government about Brexit

In European Scrutiny Committee today, Darren asked the Northern Ireland secretary – Karen Bradley MP – about Brexit, particularly in relation to Northern Ireland.

He first asked about the single market, customs arrangements (including the possibility of EU customs at Avonmouth port) and the Good Friday agreement after Brexit, and if she knew of any global examples of arrangements which might work here.

He then asked whether she had had meetings with the DUP on this issue, and on the content of these meetings.

He finally asked about whether or not we were running out of time to get customs and trade arrangements in place before Brexit.

Darren challenges the government over Universities and Defence

In Science and Technology Committee today, Darren asked Government minister Sam Gymiah – Minister for Universities and Science – about two different issues.

Firstly, he asked whether or not universities could really be expected to regulate themselves. Currently, aside from in a few high risk areas universities are responsible for regulating the integrity of their own research. Darren asked whether or not this presented a conflict of interest risk. The minister agreed, and promised to ‘keep looking at’ the issue. But he thought there was ‘no immediate’ need to do anything. You can watch this exchange below:

Secondly, Darren asked when employees of defence companies were going to know about post-Brexit contracts, including contracts for the Galileo satellite project. Currently, security co-operation with the EU after Brexit has not been negotiated, meaning that Britain’s ability to win EU defence contracts is up in the air.  You can watch this exchange here:

 

, ,

Darren speaks on Grandparents’ issues, and supports Bristol Grandparent Support Group

Currently, there is no legal right for grandparents in the UK to see their grandchildren. That can lead to some grandparents having contact with grandchildren completely halted. That’s what happened to Jane Jackson – but she used the experience to build a support group for people in a similar situations to her, and to speak out and campaign on this issue. Darren spoke in Parliament in support of her and her work.

,

Darren votes for government to release Windrush scandal documents

The government have been trying to deport UK citizens. Members of the Windrush generation, who came to Britain from the Commonwealth before 1971 and were granted UK citizenship, have been threatened with deportation because they couldn’t find the right documents from when they moved to Britain.

What’s more, the government’s ‘hostile environment’ policy, designed to make life difficult for anyone even suspected of being an illegal immigrant, will have harmed the Windrush generation.

This is because it takes benefits, housing, NHS treatment and bank account access from anyone whom the Home Office thinks can’t find the right documents.

Darren voted for the release of government documents relating to the deportation of the Windrush generation. The government voted against this.

You can read the full motion below:

That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, that she will be graciously pleased to give directions that the following papers be provided to the Home Affairs Committee: all papers, correspondence and advice including emails and text messages, from 11 May 2010 up to and including 1 May 2018, to and between Ministers, senior officials and Special Advisers relating to policy decisions including on the Immigration Acts 2014 and 2016 with regard the Windrush generation cases, including deportations, detentions and refusal of re-entry, the setting of deportation and removal targets and their effect on the Windrush generation, and action taken within Government following the concerns raised by Caribbean Governments with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office including the original decision by the Prime Minister not to meet Caribbean Heads of Government and officials, and all copies of minutes and papers relating to the Cabinet’s Immigration Implementation Taskforce.

, , , ,

Darren thanks Bristol Firefighters

MP for Bristol North West, Darren Jones has pledged his continued support to Firefighters on the second annual Firefighters’ Memorial Day.

Darren said:

“ Tomorrow (4th May) is Firefighter’s Memorial Day – at midday across the UK fire stations will fall silent for one minute to honour the memory of 2,524 firefighters who have died in the line of duty. Many other thousands will have been seriously injured performing their duty.

This memorial day, in its second year, is a hugely important tribute to some of our most-valued public servants. I will be attending my weekly surgery tomorrow morning but all firefighters will be in my thoughts. I would also like to thank all of the firefighters across Bristol for their courage, conviction and sense of care to others – each one should be proud of their work and the help they give others in often the most demanding, dangerous and stressful of circumstances”.

You can read more about Firefighters Memorial Day here.

,

Darren votes to improve anti-tax avoidance measures in the Sanctions and Anti Money Laundering Bill

Darren voted on this bill, which will decide the rules for government action on sanctions and against money laundering. Money laundering is where illegally gained money is harboured so as to make it look like it was legally gained.

Darren voted for the following changes to the bill, which were rejected by the government.

  • To create a public register of beneficial ownership information for companies and other legal entities outside of the UK that own or buy UK property, or bid for UK government contracts, within 12 months.
  • To ensure that when a company is formed in the UK, the relevant formation services must identify the beneficial owners of the company. It will also treat Companies House as a “company formation agent”, ensuring that the data on the public register of beneficial ownership for companies is accurate.
  • To remove paragraph 2(a) from Clause 48, which enables the appropriate Minister to amend, repeal or revoke enactments for regulations under section 1 or 44 using Henry VIII powers.