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Darren votes for Parliament to have final say on Brexit deal

Darren has been voting and attending debates on the EU (Withdrawal) Bill. Today he voted for an amendment which will guarantee parliament a final vote on the Brexit deal.

Darren said:

Thrilled to have actually won a vote tonight. And such an important one too. Parliament – not the Government – now gets a final say on Brexit. It took a lot of effort on a cross party basis to get this vote into the bill!

You can view Darren’s full voting record,  including all of his votes in relation to the EU (Withdrawal) Bill, here – http://www.publicwhip.org.uk/mp.php?id=uk.org.publicwhip/member/41586&showall=yes.
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Darren supports tackling tax evasion

Due to paternity leave Darren was absent at today’s votes on the Finance Bill. But he stated support for the measures to tackle tax avoidance in the bill, which included securing full transparency for offshore trusts.

He stated:

I’m paired for this vote tonight, which means a Tory MP won’t vote because I’m on paternity leave. So I’ll be recorded as an “abstention”. But it’s vital the Government listens to Labours sensible suggestions on tackling tax evasion.

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Darren calls for family friendly work practices in parliament

Darren said:

Cultures need to move on. One of the things I’m doing in the New Year is looking at how we make businesses more family-friendly because a lot of businesses see it as a woman’s role to look after the children. There are so many men who cannot get the shared paternity leave they are entitled to.

Timings in parliament are not family-friendly at all. My work is never done, but if everything is wrapped up for the day, I can take the decision to go home, cook and have a family life – I would much rather do that than hang around in the pub.

You can read the full article here:

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Science and Technology Committee Highlights

 

The hearing concerned genomics and genome editing in the NHS. Genomics is the branch of molecular biology concerned with the structure, function, evolution, and mapping of genomes. Genome editing is a type of genetic engineering in which DNA is inserted, deleted or replaced in the genome of a living organism using engineered nucleases, or “molecular scissors”.

The first set of witnesses consisted of Dr Hilary Burton, Consultant in Public Health, PHG Foundation, Professor Sian Ellard, Clinical Programme Director, South West NHS Genomic Medicine Centre, and Fiona Murphy, Director, National Services Division, NHS National Services Scotland, and Member of the Scottish Genomes Partnership.

The second set of witnesses consisted of Lord O’Shaughnessy, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health, Professor Dame Sally Davies, Chief Medical Officer for England, and Professor Patrick Chinnery, Professor of Neurology, Cambridge University.

The below question concerned the pricing for commercial enterprises to access NHS held genome data.

Darren writes to Digital Minister to call for stronger cyber security regulations

Following the Uber hack and loss of 57m data records, Darren wrote to Digital Minister Matt Hancock calling for extended cyber security regulations for essential digital services.

Read Darren’s full letter here:

 

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Darren stands up for Britain’s place in Europe during the EU Withdrawal Bill debate day 3

You can watch all of Darren’s contributions to day 3 of the EU (Withdrawal) Bill debate below, including his speech defending the Charter of Fundamental Rights.

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Darren responds to Autumn budget

Bristol North West MP, Darren Jones has expressed his disappointment that the budget today has failed to solve some of the key issues facing our country.

Darren said:

This budget fails to solve the issue of core schools funding, highlights the increasing costs of this Brexit shambles and fails to meet the needs of Bristol.

“£2.5bn has been cut from the schools budget since 2015, but now the Government has to find an additional £3bn to cover the costs of Brexit. Parents are being asked to help cover the stationary costs at their local schools whilst the Government fails to put any additional money into the core schools budget.

“Bristol has been largely ignored. We’re one of the fastest growing cities in the country but our infrastructure is creaking: we need new inner city rail, better buses, more affordable homes and real investment to help skill our people for the jobs of the future, whilst protecting our police service and the environment.

“Finally, we must all be concerned with the sound bites that have been offered by the Chancellor to cover up the real economic news today: increased inflation, increased debt and the increasing cost of Brexit.

 

On Transport

“I welcome the commitment to give £80m to our Metro Mayor. But this is far from what is needed to fund the real upgrades to transport that we need to see. I’ll be writing to the Metro Mayor to continue to make the case for funding for inner city rail, better bus routes and for projects that will prevent gridlock in North Bristol due to massive developments across the North Bristol arch.

 

On Housing

“I welcome the Stamp Duty cut for first time buyers. But it’s clear the broken housing market needs more affordable and council houses to be built in the first place. For many of my constituents, the idea that cutting Stamp Duty whilst still requiring them to have a £15,000-£30,000 deposit is laughable. I look to my colleagues at Bristol City Council to see whether the Chancellor’s pledge to lift the spending restrictions on council’s for house building will help Bristol or not. But we must also be careful of the catchy Stamp Duty headline: the Office for Budget responsibility has said that cutting stamp duty will have the ‘consequence of… increasing house prices’. This is not what young people looking to buy a house want to hear.

“The Chancellor also failed to address the issue of inflation on rent and mortgage payments. I have been in correspondence with the Governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, about the impact on my constituents from increases in the base rate. He has made it clear: Brexit is increasing costs, which means the Bank has to increase the base rate, which means people’s mortgages go up. Inflation continues to rise under this budget, and I will continue to lobby the Government to ensure that families with mortgages don’t find themselves unable to pay their mortgages due to Brexit.

“And whilst I welcome the changes to Universal Credit, including for housing benefit support, the Chancellor failed to answer the question of whether these emergency funds are loans or not. Today, they are. For constituents who get left with no support at all through no fault of their own, these emergency funds should be part of the Universal Credit and not given as loans which many struggle to repay.

 

On Healthcare

“This budget has failed to deal with the social care crisis and goes nowhere near what the CEO of the NHS has said is needed to keep hospitals like Southmead Hospital meeting the needs of patients. This budget has also failed to acknowledge to the gaps in the NHS workforce, and I am shocked that there has been nothing to address the declining number of doctors, nurses, and other medical practitioners who – in the result of a hard Brexit – may leave the workforce, leaving the NHS understaffed and unprepared for the foreseeable future.

 

On Policing

“Avon & Somerset Police has suffered from significant cuts since 2010, and continue to be forced to make more. I recently presented the “Tipping Point” report to the Policing Minister, which made it clear that the police are at breaking point. And following recent meetings with concerned residents in different parts of Bristol North West – including in Southmead – the sad truth is that the Government has failed to give any additional funds to the police to allow them to do their jobs properly.

 

Other Areas

“I am disappointed with the the lack of investment in the renewable energy sector. The Government – ignoring the concerns of a great number of people in Bristol – has failed to take advantage of the reducing cost of renewable energy and has instead opted to give the oil and gas industry a tax cut.

“And whilst funding for electric vehicle charging infrastructure is welcome, it fails to understand that local councils don’t have the staff to install the charging points the Government is giving councils the money for; it offers no upgrades to the wider electricity grid needed to ensure our energy systems can meet the needs of  new electric vehicles; and it doesn’t mention once how the Government will help people who lose their jobs from automated electric vehicles get into new work.”

Science and Technology Committee – 21st of November

The hearing subject was research integrity.

The first set of witnesses was: Professor David Hand, Royal Statistical Society, Dr Damian Pattinson, Vice President of Publishing Innovation, Research Square, and Wendy Appleby, Registrar and Head of Student & Registry Services, University College London.

The second set of witnesses was: Dr Trish Groves, Director of Academic Outreach, BMJ, Dr Elizabeth Moylan, Senior Editor for Peer Review Strategy and Innovation, BioMedCentral (representing the Committee on Publication Ethics), Catriona Fennell, Director of Publishing Services, Elsevier (representing The Publishers Association), and Dr Alyson Fox, Director of Grants Management, Wellcome Trust.

 

Highlights from Darren at the Science and Tech Committee, 14th of November

The second set of witnesses consisted of Silkie Carlo, Senior Advocacy Officer, Liberty, Dr Sandra Wachter, Lawyer and Researcher in Data Ethics, AI, and Robotics at the Oxford Internet Institute, and Dr Pavel Klimov, Chair of the Law Society’s Technology and the Law Group.

 

The subject of the Committee meeting was algorithms in decision-making.

The first set of witnesses consisted of Hetan Shah, Executive Director, Royal Statistical Society, Professor Nick Jennings, Royal Academy of Engineering, Dr Adrian Weller, Turing Fellow, Alan Turing Institute, and Professor Louise Amoore, Durham University.

The second set of witnesses consisted of Silkie Carlo, Senior Advocacy Officer, Liberty, Dr Sandra Wachter, Lawyer and Researcher in Data Ethics, AI, and Robotics at the Oxford Internet Institute, and Dr Pavel Klimov, Chair of the Law Society’s Technology and the Law Group.